Material Monday on Jewellery Packaging: Tactile Textures

Material Monday on Jewellery Packaging: Tactile Textures

Posted 7 August 2017 by Katie Kubrak

This month “Material Monday: Series 1” is examining processes and finishes that can make jewellery packaging feel special and luxurious. The question it poses is, how we can accomplish this?

In a universe of digital overload, we all stand witness to the emergence of a fascinating discipline we refer to as sensorial design. This new trade in the making encourages us to rethink the packaging surfaces we envision and produce. At the same time, it establishes a new definition of what luxury is.

With the currently trending fondness for multi-sensory experiences, this week, we explore how tactile textures can set your jewellery packaging apart from your competition, through the application of embossing.

Embossing, with origins in the 15th century, is an artful technique. With the use of two dies (male plate being raised and female recessed) the surface of substrate is elevated to create a textured impression. Depending on the effect we aim to achieve we would commonly use magnesium (low cost, quick turnaround, good for prototypes), copper (a bit higher in price but lasts longer than magnesium) or brass (for complex designs) for the die.

The sculpted reliefs achieved can be divided into the following: single-level emboss, multi-level emboss, bevel edge emboss, chisel emboss, rounded emboss, textured emboss, sculptured emboss and foil combination emboss. Please find examples of these in the image below.

You can create these tactile textures using patterns unique to your brand and product image. By introducing these intricate raised motifs in combination with suitable paper stock and foil, you can embrace the potential of packaging surfaces and become a pioneer of sensorial luxury.

If you are interested in achieving this distinctive brand presence or would simply like to participate in our event concluding “Material Monday: Series 1”, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

  

 

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