Material Monday on Scent in Packaging: Unboxing with Scented Tissue

Material Monday on Scent in Packaging: Unboxing with Scented Tissue

Posted 16 October 2017 by Katie Kubrak

The culture of constant digital connection exposes consumers to ever growing two-dimensional visual content. Interaction with sharp images, gifs or videos leaves the consumer craving physical, authentic and organic experiences as exemplified by phenomenon behind slow movement, which puts emphasis on appreciating and acknowledging details of our experiences.

This fast spreading subculture, advocated by The World Institute of Slowness [1], also encourages multi national corporations to slow down and manifest their brand personality through the tangible touch points such as sense of smell. Multiple success case studies prove that this practice can result not only in an increased brand perception, but it can equally create an unforgettable memory of unboxing.

Regardless of which sector you’re in, the trend for unique unboxing experiences, as seen in multiple YouTube videos, shows no signs of slowing down as customers welcome the only physical touch point of their e-commerce journey. An addition of original yet subtle scent, especially to high value and online purchases, has the potential of making a long-lasting impression on enthusiasts of your brand and ensuring a consistent brand perception across multi-channel sales.

Newest developments of micro-encapsulation make it now possible for scent molecules to be fixed onto a paper substrate and subsequently create tissue paper with long lasting scent. Fragrance can be selected from a vast scent library or manufactured through the process of custom olfactory production. Benefit of this practice is portrayed in a paragraph below.

Imagine you have ordered your favourite product from an online retailer. Whether it is an iconic feminine scent such as Chanel No.5 (1921), masculine such as Colonia by Aqua di Parma (1916) or a box of Lindt chocolates that tempts you with the richness of praline, truffle and cocoa, you are excited for your purchase to arrive on your doorstep within the next few days. You can either receive this goodness housed in a conventional corrugated box and wrapped in a bubble wrap or designed case and enhanced with scented tissue.

In effect, when your customer is unboxing your product, he/she can now first experience its smell as scent of Chanel No.5 or Lindt pralines. Such addition can slow down the ritual of unwrapping, add excitement and anticipation for both your product and your brand.

If you would like to prolong your customers’ packaging experience through an addition of scent, or you would simply like to visit our exhibition launched during London Design Festival 17 titled “London in Seven Scents”, which was released to coincide with “Perfume” exhibition at Somerset House and “Material Monday: Series 2”, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

We would love to hear from you!

User scenario: User receives ordered goods via mail.

User scenario: User begins to open up a conventional box.

User scenario:Conventional sensorial experience presented to the user during unboxing.

User scenario:Designed box upon opening engages users’ scent of smell through scented tissue.

User scenario: Christmas gift box could include tissue that releases scent of Christmas such as cinnamon, ginger bread or spiced Christmas cookies.

User scenario: On this example we propose that cosmetic products like Bio Active Body Exfoliant by Sans that consists of organic ingredients such as coconut oil, ginseng extract, cocoa seed butter have the potential to translate scent of its singular ingredients or combined aroma of these and add it to its e-commerce tissue paper.

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